Smile Analysis Burlington

Smile Analysis Burlington

While it is true that beauty is in the eye of the beholder, research has suggested that the beholder’s eye will often seek out the same characteristic as the next beholder’s eye.  

 

So the question is, how would you rate your smile?

 

 

Smile Line

As a general rule, the curvature of the upper teeth, from ear to ear, should follow the curvature of the lower lip. This line is known as the smile line. Common concerns that people express about their smiles include smile lines that are too flat, making their teeth look aged or worn, Of in instances of exclusive wear Of grinding, an inverted smile line where the back teeth are actually longer than the front teeth.

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Dominance of Central Incisors

The smile is a social tool, developed over millions of years of evolutionary history. We are hardwired to look at the smile of the person standing opposite us and of the smile, our focus is usually drawn first to the central incisors. Research suggests that we find most appealing, central incisors that have a width to length ratio of approximately 80%. this ratio is much larger, then the central incisors lack dominance. On the other hand, if the ratio is much smaller, the person appears to have buck teeth.

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Golden Proportions

As far back as ancient Greek and Roman civilizations, they have known about . The proportion is repeated throughout nature, and even in the body, the proportion can be found. In the mouth, the ratio translate into the width of the two central incisors being equal to the distance from the midline to the cuspid.

 
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Midline and Occlusal plane

An aesthetic smile generally has a midline that is vertical and perpendicular to the occlusal plane that should be horizontal. While there may a certain amount of variation from the ideal, research has suggested that a canted midline is the most noticeable.

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Axial Inclination

The long axis of the anterior six teeth (or social six) should be arranged in increasingly divergent orientations. If they are too parallel, it can make the social six teeth look too wide, and the teeth too full for the lips. Similarly, asymmetrical angulations tends to be immediately noticeable.

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Anterior and Posterior Silhouettes

The outer edges of the social six and the visible line angles of the back teeth are referred to as anterior and posterior silhouettes respectively. In an ideal smile, the anterior silhouettes should echo from midline outwards, while the posterior silhouettes should be parallel from front to back. The most common reasons for disruptions in the silhouettes are teeth that have been crowded out of the arch, or teeth that are rotated out of their natural positions.

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Progression of Incisal Embrasures

The points of separation of the social six teeth at the incisal edges are known as embrasures. In an ideal smile, the embrasure between the two central incisors should be the narrowest, the embrasure between the central and the lateral incisors should be wider and the embrasure better the lateral incisor and the cuspid should be the widest.

 
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Progression of contact Points

The contact points between the central incisors, the central incisor and lateral incisor. and lateral incisor and cuspid are naturally arranged so that the contacts are positioned more apically as you move back.

 
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Gradation of Teeth Posteriorly

If you imagine your mouth as operating on a hinge (which it is). You would expect the front teeth to be longer than the ones in the back. This principle actually relates back to the smile line, where in order for the incisal edges of the teeth to follow the curvature of the lower lip, the teeth have to become shorter as you approach the back.

 
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Arch Form

Symmetry is a recurring theme through the body, even if it isn’t adhered to down to the millimeter. As a general rule, if a line were to be drawn through the midline, the positions of the teeth should be symmetrically arranged. Common reasons for asymmetry are crowding, loss of tooth structure and rotations.

 

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Gingival Zenith

The top of the gingival scallop is known as the gingival zenith, and the positions of the various zeniths are ideally arranged so that the central incisor and cuspid zeniths are approximately even with one another, while the lateral incisor zeniths are usually 1 millimeter lower.

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Vertical Dimension

The ideal smile should show approximately 3-4 mm of gingiva More than that, and the smile appears gummy whereas less than 3 mm of gingiva is generally more acceptable. The reasons for a gummy smile can either be due to excessive gingival tissue, a short lip, an hyperactive lip (lifts too far during the smile) Of an upper jaw that is simply longer than average.

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Colour

This parameter is the most personal, as everyone has there own opinion  to how white is too white. However, as a general rule, the front four teeth are usually the lightest. the cuspids are darker, and the posterior teeth growing darker, the further back you go. Other considerations when deciding on the colour, include how much translucency should be present at the incisal edges and whether or not the teeth should be darker towards the gingiva.

Smile Analysis Burlington ON